Idaho National Laboratory scientists and engineers work every day to solve complex challenges and discover ways to make our world safer and more energy-efficient. Ideas abound, and INL has the unique infrastructure, capabilities, equipment and programs to test concepts and bring them to reality. One of the main goals of research is to commercialize promising technology, and make it available to the world.

Bringing an idea to market requires collaboration between research and business management in order to maneuver through complex rules and requirements. Scientists and engineers often rely on experts who understand market opportunities and who can protect intellectual property rights. This collaboration leads to real-word success: over the past decade, INL has signed 697 new technology license agreements, executed 145 competitive research and development agreements and completed 417 agreements with federal agencies and private sector entities worth nearly $1.4 billion.

To improve the process between discovery and deployment, INL’s Partnerships Directorate recently fortified its Technology Deployment team. Led by Amy Lientz, the Partnerships organization includes public affairs, university partnerships, economic development, state and regional affairs and workforce development.

Jason Stolworthy was recruited to lead Technology Deployment, resuming his decade-long career at INL after spending nearly three years overseas establishing an Intellectual Property and Technology Transfer Office for the country of Qatar.

Mark Kaczor was promoted to lead INL’s commercialization efforts in energy and homeland security. Kaczor brought on Paul Berg, a former Amazon.com employee and recognized software licensing expert, to facilitate the use and deployment of open source software. Kaczor also hired Jonathan Cook, a former licensing and commercialization specialist, who will use expertise in market analysis to increase the commercial relevance of INL research.

Commercialization managers are crucial components to the technology deployment team. Art Baker, a former executive at Halliburton, was recently hired to oversee INL’s technology deployment efforts in nuclear energy. Gary Smith, INL’s most senior commercialization manager in nuclear energy, will now focus on high-profile nuclear energy technologies.

These new members join an existing team of technology transfer and commercialization experts dedicated to commercializing new technologies.

“A major initiative for INL is to make it easier for industry to connect with INL’s capabilities and technologies,” said Lientz. “We are excited to have such a strong and capable team to assist in achieving INL’s vision.” She encourages interested parties to go to the Partnerships website www.inl.gov/partnerships to learn more about the team and upcoming opportunities and to provide feedback. “We intend to make it easier to do business with INL, so please share ideas with members of our team.”